Private Montego Bay Airport Transfers

Private Montego Bay Airport Transfers

Your vacation is taking you to the beautiful island of Jamaica, and you are arriving at the Montego Bay airport; the perfect option for ground transportation is Private Airport Transfer. More and more travelers are opting for private transportation; they describe it as the best way to save precious vacation time and put control in their hands.
The evolution of technology has afforded travelers even more power to choose. Access to past visitors’ reviews allow for informed decisions when choosing a company; with just a smart phone anyone could stay half way around the world and choose the best private airport transportation. Potential passengers are able to choose the best rates and even make special request prior to arriving.

 

You are no doubt a smart traveler, so you would never leave your ground transportation to chance. After all, you did spend a lot of time planning your trip – carefully choosing your hotel, looking over menu, assessing the weather patterns and you have conditioned your mind for a great adventure during your stay. When you choose to pre-book your Montego Bay Airport Transfer, you will have the chance to research the taxi company beforehand, even choose your driver so that you are guaranteed a personable, patient and jovial person to enhance your trip.

Private taxi is by far your best transportation solution in Jamaica. This is true for airport transfers as well as tours and excursions. The experience with Private Transfers is more like renting a vehicle that comes with a personal operator. You are basically in charge, and without the risk of mistakenly driving on the right side of the road.

Any visit to Jamaica without some kind of island tour would be an injustice to a visitor; there is so much to see that you can’t afford to miss; going out of the resort for at least a day is the icing on a “Jamaican Vacation Cake. Don’t leave without experiencing a beautiful country with warm and friendly people who greet you with an infectious smile.

There is a great deal awaiting all travelers; so many excursions just beckoning for your attention. The country is loaded with beautiful waterfalls, beaches, excursions such as river tubing, rafting, horse-back riding, zip line, ATV, Dune buggy and much more. Whatever your interests are, there is something in Jamaica for you.

Welcome to Fall

Welcome to Fall

I have just spent a week in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The foliage was just starting to turn into a wonderful koliascope of colors. Unseasonably warm then while there, we are now getting back to the usual temperatures of October. The gardens are wilting down, the skins on the tomatoes are thicker, canning and freezing are in full operation. Corn stalks are turning brown in the fields, and as the leaves die back, acres of bright orange pumpkins are evident against the backdrop of browning leaves. Sumacs along the edge of the swamps are bright red and are probably the earliest of the changing season.
The tree leaves, although still changing color here, are starting to drop. They go in stages. Most noticeable are the maples as they seem to go overnight. The oaks, that are most abundant in this area, go more slowly. Many do not lose all of their leaves over the fall but wait for spring and new growth. All I really know is that by Thanksgiving I will be knee deep in leaves and thanking God for leaf blowers.

 

Right now the houses on the street are slowly starting to sport scarecrows, orange lights, pumpkins, and corn stalks. Soon the neighborhood children will be buying and making costumes for trick-or-treating. I’m stocking up on candy bars as there will be about one hundred little ones knocking at my door. Some not so little ones, too. I chuckle at the less than one-year-olds that come in their parents’ arms, knowing full well that these babe-in-arms will get none of the bounties.

It is a wonderful time of year. With a chill in the air, it is a great time for walking and hiking. Despite a year with a heavy infestation of gypsy moths, the oak trees have put out an abundance of acorns. That means that with this bounty the squirrels will have been just as busy reproducing large litters. That may mean a problem for next year. If the season does not provide for the newcomers, then the population of squirrels will dwindle again. They come and go from year to year.

It’s the time of year that I start looking towards my own Halloween decorating. I don’t do a lot, but do enjoy carving pumpkins. Choosing from a collection of patterns that were collected over the years, I pick them based on available time and the effort required to do the work. There is a ghost that hangs from a tree to welcome the kids with a cackle. Using white paper bags and black silhouettes, luminaria lines the walk up to the front door. The advent of flickering battery operated lights take away the danger of flames in the pumpkins and luminaria. Other smaller lights and decorations are brought out of storage. The costume for the dog involves a bandana and motorcycle hat. My own costume comes from a collection in that same storage area and varies from year to year. With a motorcycle dog, then a motorcycle Mama may end up being the choice.

Not a big fan of roasted pumpkin seeds, when the guts are pulled from the pumpkins, I put the collection in a large shallow roasting pan. This pan is placed on a storage box on the deck just outside of the living room window. From my recliner, I am privy to a private show of the squirrels coming up to feed on them. It keeps them out of the bird feeders. The biggest male always stakes his claim on the pan of seeds, chasing away all others. Somehow that just doesn’t seem fair.

Man vs Wildlife – Creating a Sustainable Society on Galapagos

Man vs Wildlife – Creating a Sustainable Society on Galapagos

The Galapagos Islands are primarily known for their abundance of unique wildlife and as the place in which Charles Darwin’s conducted the research that led to his Theory of Evolution. For those who explore the area on a Galapagos wildlife cruise, a visit to this fragile, fascinating chain of islands is a once-in-a-lifetime experience; but for more than 25,000 people, the archipelago is home.
A Growing Population

 

Since the 1970s the population has increased greatly, with more than 75% of the current number having migrated from the mainland. Human occupation is restricted to an area that encompasses just 3% of the total land, with the vast majority living in the coastal towns on Santa Cruz, Floreana, San Cristobal and Isabela. A far smaller proportion (around 15%) lives in the more rural areas.

Most of the migration occurred for economic reasons, with a rapidly growing tourism industry and a declining standard of living on the Ecuadorian mainland. Before the implementation of the special immigration protocols in 1998, it was estimated that at the then-current rate, the population of the archipelago could double every decade. Since then, stricter controls have been put in place by the Ecuadorean government, which include a system of Transit Control Cards for all visitors coming into the area on Galapagos wildlife cruise itineraries.

Creating a Sustainable Society

Creating a sustainable society in a conservation area is not without its challenges, but the Conservancy of the islands is dedicated to the ongoing education of residents to “become champions of conservation”. The aim is to encourage locals to look at subsistence through a different lens to that of mainland living. Rather than trying to recreate a lifestyle that relies heavily on imported produce, machinery and techniques that are at odds with the environment, it encourages locals to consider themselves “stewards of the archipelago”, and live within a system more compatible with biodiverse preservation.

Education: the Key to the Future

Along with the Charles Darwin Foundation and the Ministry of Education, the Conservancy is working towards education reform designed to foster a strong sense of values and engagement. Their focus is on demonstrating examples of “best practice” to teachers and administrators first, with a view to transferring this to classrooms.

Sustainable Practices in the Community

Another area in which the Conservancy is active is in increasing the capacity of sustainable agriculture throughout the archipelago, by demonstrating alternative methods of farming and environmental management.

Introduced domestic pets present a grave danger to the local wildlife; the Conservancy’s Humane Pet Management promotes responsible pet ownership and sterilisation in partnership with the Animal Balance organisation.

FUNDAR

The local Foundation for Responsible Alternative Development (FUNDAR) believes the establishment of a strong civil society is imperative to the base of any social change in the archipelago. “Citizens must act together with a common goal in order for change to happen.” While only a very small percentage of locals oppose the concept of sustainable development, in reality not much is understood about what it entails. They say it is an inter-generational process, which involves allowing residents to benefit in the “now”, but in a way that also assures that future generations can benefit too.

The Responsibility of All

While there is still some way to go until the region becomes a truly sustainable society, everybody who visits can do their part to ensure that the values are upheld. For anyone visiting on a Galapagos wildlife cruise, this means respecting the National Park Code of Conduct at all times and not doing anything to upset the balance of the ecosystem.

A Barger’s Guide to the Canal du Nivernais

A Barger’s Guide to the Canal du Nivernais

Amongst the beautiful inland waterways of France, the Canal du Nivernais offers a scenic cruising route through the bucolic, history-laden landscape of Burgundy. Originally created as a feeder waterway along which to float firewood, today it has a very different incarnation as a popular route for the new breed of barge holidays in France.
A Working Waterway

 

The 174km-long Canal du Nivernais serves as part of the wider Bourbonnais and Bourgogne link between Paris and Lyon. It runs north-south between the basin of the Seine (at Paris) and the Saône and Rhône, almost parallel to the Yonne. Along the way it connects the Yonne with the Loire at Auxerre and Decize, respectively. Its strategic position was no accident and, in 1783, the French government commissioned its construction as a channel to transport the firewood so desperately needed by the freezing residents of Paris.

It was many more years before it reached completion (in 1843), but it then became a vital transportation hub for everything from wood and wine, to coal, stone and charcoal. The canal is fed by the Yonne and also from the north by another feeder canal leading from the Pannecière Reservoir, via the beautifully-constructed and much-admired Montreuillon aqueduct.

There are 122 locks and 23 dams along its length and in one section three tunnels have been hewn from solid rock to allow its passage. Travelling through the tunnels has been described as a silence so complete it is akin to “the silence of a sepulchre”. Despite the magnificent feat of engineering required to complete its course, many of the locks were constructed to what were deemed ‘sub-standard’ specifications. This meant that with a length of only 30m, some of them were unable to accommodate larger barges, leading to a decline in the waterway’s usefulness.

It wasn’t until the 1960s that the local authorities saw the potential of the Canal du Nivernais as a touristic attraction, and an extensive decade-long rehabilitation programme was implemented. The works provided facilities and mooring for private and commercial vessels along the route, which has enabled operators to include the canal on the itinerary of their barge holidays in France. A host of surrounding attractions can be enjoyed from the water and on shore-based excursions.

Attractions en Route One of the most popular attractions en route is the magnificent Saint-Germain Abbey, in Auxerre. Dating back more than a thousand years, the monastic complex contains a veritable treasure trove of history within its cloistered walls. Along with the oldest wall paintings in the country, archaeologists have unearthed a sarcophagus from the sixth century and the crypts, nave and tower of the abbey are almost completely intact.

Something a little more energetic that can be undertaken along the canal route at the lovely village of Merry-sur-Yonne is climbing at the famous landmark, Le Saussois. This imposing crag set against a highly picturesque backdrop is renowned as one of the most challenging climbing sites in the country, although there are plenty of pre-bolted areas for novices to cut their teeth as well.

With a reputation as one of the most interesting and enjoyable places for barge holidays in France, the history, engineering and scenery of the Canal du Nivernais serve as an important reminder of the past and a delightful insight into the present.

Ski in the New Year at These Top Resorts

Ski in the New Year at These Top Resorts

New Year’s Eve is supposed to be the biggest party of the year, but too often it is a let-down and no different to your average night out. This year, why not see out 2017 with a bang by jetting off for an exhilarating ski break? Ski resorts are superb places to see in the New Year as you can shred the slopes and then party till the early hours in the fresh snow under an endless blanket of stars. This certainly beats paying to go to the local pub back home!
There are plenty of great resorts around Europe that have wild New Year’s Eve parties and excellent skiing, but here are a few of the best:

 

Meribel

Meribel is always a cracking place for New Year and a favourite with Brits. The parties kick off with a cool torch-lit descent to the Chaudanne area where there is an enormous fireworks display. You are spoilt for choice for epic parties after this, and a lively atmos-phere sweeps across the entire resort. Le Rond Point is a popular spot if you want to see in 2018 by dancing until the early hours, whilst Le Poste de Secours is the place to be for cocktails. Jacks and Dicks Tea Bar are also worth checking out.

In terms of skiing, Meribel has lots of great runs and easy access to the 600km slopes across Le Trois Valleys – perfect!

Tignes

The NYE parties at Tignes are legendary and the best choice for raucous party animals. They host the biggest free outdoor party in all of Europe, as the resort is transformed into a mammoth open-air music festival that goes on well into January 1st. Thumping tunes, fireworks and fire displays in the snow under the stars is the perfect way to end the year! Tignes always pulls huge names too, such as David Guetta and Joachim Garraud.

What better way to cure your hangover than hitting the slopes? Tignes has excellent conditions, 150 km of local slopes and access to Val d’Isère if you wish.

Val d’Isère

Val d’Isère is, in my humble opinion, the prettiest town in the Alps and a great setting for a special New Year’s Eve. It is home to many excellent bars, pubs and clubs, so you should easily be able to find something that suits your taste for the big night. Places like the Doudoune Club pull big names and even rival some UK clubs! Additionally, the town centre is an amazing place to be when the clock strikes 12 as everyone comes together for a grand countdown and champagne showers.

As most of the slopes being above 2500m, there will be terrific skiing on offer here too.

Mayrhofen

Mayrhofen in Tyrol, Austria is another popular destination for NYE thanks to the variety of options on offer. It is home to lots of cool establishments, most notably the Ice Bar and Gasthof Bruecke which both have wild NYE parties with live music and dancing on tables deep into the new year. Another reason that I recommend Mayrhofen is the New Year’s Eve train, which is a party train from Jenbach to Mayrhofen which stops off for live music and drinks at each stop! There is also a horse-drawn carriage procession to the snowy racecourse on New Year’s Day (if you’re not too hungover!).

Mayrhofen also has 159 km of piste and features Austria’s steepest run – Harakiri.

Any of these resorts would be a superb choice for an unforgettable New Year filled with snow, skiing, partying and joy. Shuttle Direct can get you, your troops and all your ski gear to any of these resorts with ease, so you can sit back and start planning how to bring in 2018!

Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

This attracts a lot of people making money by posting videos on YouTube.

Tutorials, family vacations, product reviews and other silly antics make the rich overnight.

But have you ever heard of weedtubers?

These are the people who get paid to smoke marijuana and put it up on the internet.

That’s right – get paid for baking.

Read on to find out some of the most famous weedtubers around.

Joel Hradecky: King Weedtubers
Considered the king of the weedtubers, Joel Hradecky has over 1.2 million followers, whom he found only in a short time.

His CustomGrow420 YouTube channel featured videos including him who tried to suck THC oil grams. This video garnered over 1.3 million views.

That number is almost the same as 1.5 million who saw Hradecky cough for seven minutes after his effort. It seems that Hradecky’s success thrives, in part, on the psychological notion that humans enjoy watching other humans suffer. Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

But this marijuana king not only toke up and make the audience laugh (or mock) over the love of entertainment. Thousands of fans actually turned to Hradecky for recommendations about bongs, strands of marijuana and other accessories.

Josh Young
If you are primarily looking for advice and information about smoking weeds, different ways can be smoked, or weed prices, Young is your man.

On her YouTube channel StrainCentral, smoking young marijuana from 3-10 times a day, right next to the viewers.

Young thinks that sometimes his fans are just, “looking for friends smoking.”

In the same way as other weedtubers like Hradecky, Young also posted a video showing the effort to smoke a large quantity of THC in a short time and its horrible effects.

With over 373,000 subscribers, Young obviously makes a really good smoking buddy!

Reef Reef Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up
Being a harvester is not just for boys. Do not worry women, you can also be famous for smoking on YouTube too!

Just look at Coral Reefer. If you are looking for an interactive weedtube experience, Coral Reefer is your girl.

Coral Reefer hosts a live show every Sunday called “Stoney Sunday Live” where she answers pitch-related questions from viewers and fans. Coral is very passionate about marijuana and its many benefits.

Visit her channel and you’ll see her attend the cannabis show and share info about what’s going on in marijuana news.

Jane Dro
Another grass enthusiast who represents female cannabis lovers out there is Jane Dro. Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

If you want a more educational experience when it comes to marijuana, Dro is a great information center. Dro tells viewers about the growing ins and outs of marijuana and offers tips, as well as the look inside his own farming chamber.

Check out Dro channels for video and in-depth product reviews for serious and serious cannabis users. You might even see the following marijuana smoking star on our list while watching the Dro channel – both of which often appear in their respective videos.

Soundrone
You can not have a good smoking session without some nice snacks. Soundrone is about unboxing and reviewing products – and not just marijuana related items.

Visiting this unique channel channel will allow you to see candy, drink and snack reviews. A perfect compliment to your height.

His studies are often distracted by him who gets beaten from a bong or dull. Soundrone must have done something right because not only was he a successful successor, he was also a businessman.

Soundrone has its own hex axis line known as Bee Lasso.

Are you Next Next Big YouTube?
It’s hard not to be motivated by these itedtuber stars. They get paid to do what they love – that’s a great American dream, is not it?

Crazy Family Fun in Chamonix

Crazy Family Fun in Chamonix

Chamonix is known as one of the best skiing areas in the world – and rightly so! It has a wide-ranging array of pistes that the whole family can enjoy together. From nursery slopes for your little ones to advanced, adrenaline-fuelled pistes for adults and teenagers, Chamonix has something special for everyone.
In addition to skiing, there are many other fun-filled and family-friendly activities that’ll make your ski holiday an exciting adventure that the kids will never forget.

 

Dog Sledding

Are your kids big fans of puppers and woofers? Then you’ll definitely see their eyes light up when you take them dog sledding.

Bred from wolf and domestic dog (usually husky) crosses, these friendly animals love to pull sleds, and they’re so elegant that it makes for a really smooth ride. What’s more, these animals are super affectionate, and you’ll probably find you want one as a pet if you treat the family to a dog sledding experience! This activity is increasingly popular, so make sure to book in advance to avoid disappointment.

Paragliding

How does soaring through the snowy peaks of the Alps sound?

Thanks to its glaciers, rugged peaks and eagles, Chamonix is known as the Mecca of mountain flying. Even beginners can enjoy a huge adrenaline rush and amazing flights with very high levels of safety, as the gear is really advanced. If you don’t want to take lessons, tandem flying is also is an option – you’ll take to the skies with an experienced pilot, who will introduce you to the sights that this stunning region has to offer.

Snowshoeing

This is a wonderful way for the whole family to experience the region’s alpine beauty. Snowshoeing takes you away from the over-crowded slopes to the snowy mountains, where you can see deer, foxes and hares in their natural habitat. Why not venture onto glacial terrain for something a little more exciting? Or how about leaving the kids with a child minder and enjoying a moonlit snowshoeing adventure?

Ice Skating

The Richard Bozon Sports Centre boasts an Olympic-sized indoor ice rink, as well as a smaller outdoor rink that’s only a short walk away from the town centre. Give this fun winter sport a whirl, or pop by for the local teams’ ice hockey matches, cheering them on as they play a home game.

How to Get There

Many budget airlines offer several flights every day from the UK to Geneva, with a flight time of only 90 minutes from London. Getting to Chamonix from Geneva couldn’t be easier – simply book a transfer with Shuttle Direct for a quick and easy journey to your accommodation in Chamonix. From Geneva, the transfer only takes about an hour, so you’ll be out on the slopes with the family in no time!

It’s A Women’s World: The ‘Ladies’ Château’ of the Loire Valley

It’s A Women’s World: The ‘Ladies’ Château’ of the Loire Valley

A French barge cruise on one of European Waterways luxurious, fully-crewed barge hotels is an experience to remember. We firmly believe that there is no better way to explore the Continent than from the water.
The Nymphea hosts our French barge cruise in the Loire Valley, passing under the remarkable five-arch bridge of the Château de Chenonceau. Built in a pale grey stone, the bridge’s symmetrical curves are juxtaposed against the castle’s pointed turrets and enchant our guests time and time again

 

It’s not only architecture and engineering buffs who fall in love on the banks of the River Cher. The unique history of the Château – spanning from the early sixteenth century to the modern day – is well worth discovering.

Hidden Histories

Cruising beneath the repeated arches of the gallery aboard our French barge cruise, our guests often wonder who created them.

Today we are looking at some of the famous inhabitants of the ‘Ladies’ Château’ – the women who shaped both this beautiful building and France.

The Mistress: Diane de Poitiers

Intellectual, royal-favourite Diane de Poitiers lived in sixteenth-century France; no decorative wallflower, Diane was intelligent and politically savvy. She became so well-liked by King Henry II that she often wrote and signed official correspondence on his behalf using the portmanteau ‘HenriDiane’.

Diane was also the King’s mistress for over two decades – perhaps the most powerful woman in the country. As Henry’s mistress she was given the Château de Chenonceau. Diane not only lovingly developed the gardens, she commissioned the stunning arched bridge spanning the river – one of the most iconic architectural features of the Loire Valley.

The Wife: Catherine de’Medici

Catherine de’Medici was the wife of Henry II and, understandably, was jealous Diane’s influential position in Henry’s court. After Henry’s death Catherine forced Diane de Poitiers, the legal owner of the property, to leave and triumphantly took possession herself. Determined to make the Château her own, Catherine installed a grand gallery running across Diane’s bridge – the strong-willed widow had successfully displaced the trusted mistress.

Under Catherine’s management, the castle became the site for many extravagant parties and, rumour has it, the first ever firework display in France lit up the sky over one of her night time revels.

The Saloniste: Louise Dupin

During the French Enlightenment, eighteenth-century French women were at the centre of literary, artistic and cultural advancements. Louise Dupin, who lived in the Château de Chenonceau with her husband, formed a literary salon there which drew in leaders of the Enlightenment movement such as Voltaire, Condillac, Buffon and Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle.

An intelligent woman herself, Louise saved the building during the widespread destruction of property prompted by the Revolution. Louise pointed out that the arched bridge provided a rare crossing place on the river essential for the movement of people and trade. As a result of her quick thinking and bravery we can enjoy the splendour of the Château de Chenonceau in the twenty-first century.

Fun Facts About Skiing to Amuse the Kids

Fun Facts About Skiing to Amuse the Kids

I think that there is no type of family holiday that’s better than a ski holiday in a catered chalet. Family skiing trips allow you to bond, spend quality time together in a unique set-ting and try new activities. In addition to this, you definitely won’t have to spend time cooking if you book a catered chalet! You can benefit from the cosy accommodation’s roominess and great facilities. This will create many happy memories that you will all look back on fondly.
If you want to pique the kids’ enthusiasm in the run-up to the holiday, there is no better way than intriguing them with some fun facts about skiing. Here is a collection of my fa-vourites.

 

Origins

There is some debate about where the thrilling winter sport of skiing originated. Many claim that it was invented in the snowy terrain of Norway, as ancient carvings about ski-ing have been discovered in this area. Another reason for believing that it first began in Norway is that the word ‘ski’ comes from the Old Norse word skíð, which translates to ‘a piece of wood’.

Sounds like a solved case, right? Wrong! It is thought that tribesmen in the Altai Moun-tains (in Central and East Asia) were shredding powder even before the Scandinavians. A ski that dates back to approximately 8000-7000 BC was uncovered near a lake in Russia, creating an interesting debate about the true origins of this hugely popular activ-ity.

Early Form of Transportation

Back in these prehistoric days, it is unlikely that people were skiing for fun. Instead, the sport surely served as an early form of transportation. It is easy to see why, as it provides the ability to quickly travel across challenging terrain – it’s not surprising, then, that skiing was even used as a mode of transportation during the First and Second World Wars.

Heard of a Snurfer?

Let’s quickly turn our attention to snowboarding. Did you know that the very first snow-board was called a ‘snurfer’? This somewhat comical name was given to a contraption that was invented by the American Sherman Poppen in 1965, when he connected two skis to create a skateboard without wheels. Unfortunately, the funny name did not stick, but about one million snurfers were sold over the next decade.

Olympic Sport

Alpine/downhill racing originated in Sweden and dates back to 1879, but it did not be-come an Olympic event until 1936. This is unlike cross-country skiing, which has been a part of every single Winter Olympics since its inaugural year in 1924. In contrast, snow-boarding only made its Olympic debut at the 1998 Games in Nagano, Japan.

Space Skiing

This fun fact is certainly one to remember. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, who was on the famous space shuttle Apollo 17, claims that our moon has the perfect terrain for cross-country skiing and that this technique could actually help astronauts traverse its surface. Who knows – perhaps one day families will be able to book lunar ski holidays!

Speed skiing – faster than a car!

Skiing is one of the fastest sports in the world, and some speed skiers can reach speeds that are faster than a car! Passenger cars can reach speeds of around 120 mph, whilst the current world record for skiing is a blistering 156.2 mph. This was set by the Italian skier Simone Origone in 2006.

A Global Activity

Skiing is immensely popular in modern times, and those who have experienced the adrenaline rush and awesome surroundings know why! You can find ski resorts in around 80 countries worldwide, and approximately 350 million people visit these resorts every year.

These fun facts are sure to dazzle your little ones – consider sharing them before your trip or possibly in your catered chalet after a fun day on the slopes!

Art and Culture,Travel & Tourism,Recreation & Leisure

 

Art and Culture,Travel & Tourism,Recreation & Leisure
This collection of porcelain art in Jingdezhen, the porcelain capital of China is a breath-taking sight of ingenuity – the Sanbao Art Museum!
Sanbao village, a scenic place not far from the Central City of Jingdezhen in China, hosts a nascent, dynamic, porcelain-centric hub with porcelain artists’ studios and porcelain-related industries, causing a highly competitive environment, where it takes great ingenuity and endless efforts to be the best. The relationship between the artists and their creation is sort of romantic, like the feeling of first love: indirect probing, exploring, negotiating and subtle manoeuvring. And the transformation in the pottery kilns is like the process of developing films – full of uncertainties; like the photographers’ having projected their best imaginations onto the films, but results will be unravelled only after the mandatory stint in the dark room!

 

But it is these very risks and uncertainties that mandate detail and delicacy; brain power juxtaposed against a passionate song in the heart… romanticism at its best!

An art museum in this milieu not just builds an interactive space to encourage reciprocal communication between visitors and the space, both emotionally and behaviourally, it inculcates sensitivity and imagination. The museum is a visually linear shape, 150m long, but the visiting flow is nonlinear, with visitors having multiple paths to explore. The purpose is to boost serendipity between people and spaces. Architecture creates the atmosphere with which visitors have personal connections. Walls, the most important part at shaping exhibition space and atmosphere, are made of rammed earth to offer a poetic feeling. The main passage is a long transparent space, 100m; around which rammed-earth walls, 4m high, grow from earth.

Major materials used in building the museum, such as rammed earth, titanium zinc panels and travertine, will be eroded by time. This process of erosion is like the fermentation of wine, time gives its unique flavour. In addition, Sanbao village naturally produces unique soil, slightly red in colour, so the continuous loam walls are built with local clay, delivering a certain familiarity and tension.

Experiences vary, when visitors walk through different areas, attracted by the outstretched eaves after the woods area. The sound from the creeks relaxes, whilst what lies ahead leads visitors further into a cryptic but joyful world. Every tour becomes a story between visitors and architecture – a mix of discovery, expectation, waiting, anxiety, disappointment and joy. DL atelier is the recent winner of the American Architecture Price (cultural architecture category),